Monthly Archives: April 2014

Old Fashioned Remedies: Witch Hazel & A Bonus Bug Spray DIY

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Old Fashioned Remedies: Witch Hazel & A Bonus Bug Spray DIY

Past & Present

Many seem to have forgotten the almost magical qualities of witch hazel, but it deserves so much more recognition. Victorians used to keep gallon jugs of witch hazel on their vanities for the extract’s multi-purpose use.

Wondering what witch hazel can do for you? To start with:

  • Witch hazel reduces inflammation, making it ideal for treating acne and under-eye bags
  • Use it on bruises to help them heal faster
  • Treat itching & swelling from poison ivy or poison oak
  • Soothe a sunburn with witch hazel to help it feel better & heal faster

…And more!

Summer’s coming up, and that means it’s almost mosquito season. For many of us, however, the chemical-laden bug sprays on the market are a little suspicious.

Witch hazel offers a solution that doesn’t leave your skin smelling like chemicals for hours. It’s a natural bug repellant (but if you’re caught out without bug spray, it makes…

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The Ultimate Cheat Sheet for Evaluating Antiques

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The Ultimate Cheat Sheet for Evaluating Antiques

Past & Present

It takes years to become an adept antiques evaluator, especially with the ability to evaluate more than one kind of antique.

If you have an item sitting around that you want to know more about, take these steps to become more knowledgeable about your item.

You won’t get a spot as an Antiques Roadshow appraiser, but this cheat sheet will at least help you recognize the quality of Grandma’s old tea set.

A vintage travel gear store in Paris (via Jorge Royan, CC) A vintage travel gear store in Paris (via Jorge Royan, CC 3.0)

1) Research.

Get to know the item you’re evaluating. A quick Google search will turn up every imaginable kind of antique and collectible, so the chance is someone else out there is asking the same questions.

You can also go old-school and see what those things with words printed on dead trees say (what are those called? Books?) about collectibles. These are likely to be…

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