Sustainable Living: Kitchen Tips from the Great Depression

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Sustainable Living: Kitchen Tips from the Great Depression

Originally posted on Past & Present:

It just so happens that sustainable living practices coincide with times of recession.

It makes sense, when you think about it. During economic recession, saving money means using less – turning down the heat, making your own dinner, and using less fuel, being kind to the earth as a result.

In general, these practices also mean being healthier. It’s a 3-in-1 deal, and how can you say no to that?

The amount of things you can do to save energy are only as limited as your imagination. It just means reworking how you think. Do you really need to throw away that Ziplock bag, or can you reuse it?

Today’s tip: Make your own food.

(This goes along with our post about victory gardens! Growing your own vegetables, fruit and herbs is cheap and fun.)

Pre-made/frozen meals use more plastic & cardboard waste than home-cooked meals, not to…

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The Art of Petit Point

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The Art of Petit Point

Originally posted on Past & Present:

The Arts and Crafts Era from the late 1860′s to the early 1900′s resulted in high-quality creations that relished traditional craftsmanship. Most of these were simple items like furniture; the difference was that they were made through handmade methods instead of being manufactured in a factory.

In the mid 19th century, a group of friends at the University of Oxford dreamed up the movement in response to developing industrialism. The group instead favored Romanticism and the Pre-Raphaelites.

Vintage compact from the Arts and Crafts Era.

Vintage compact from the Arts and Crafts Era.

This vintage compact, created in the Arts and Crafts Era, used the process of needlepoint called “petit point”. Petit point was the kind of method that members of the Arts and Crafts movement probably loved for its close craftsmanship. This method is similar to regular needlepoint, but is actually smaller and finer, though the two terms are often used interchangeably. It’s a small stitch…

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Traveling with Art: Mount Fuji, Japan

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Traveling with Art: Mount Fuji, Japan

Originally posted on Past & Present:

What mountain could be better-known than Mount Fuji?

These hand-painted postcards featuring Mount Fuji have been created with care in an example of fine handiwork as testament to this famous icon of Japan.

Handpainted postcard showing the view from near Mount Fuji.

The view from near Mount Fuji .

Mount Fuji is the highest mountain in Japan and is an active stratovolcano. It sits on Honshu Island, the most populated island of the country.

The first to climb Mount Fuji was a monk in 663, and the first foreigner, named Sir Rutherford Alcock, reached the summit in eight hours in 1868.

When Edo (which is now Tokyo) became the capital of Japan, people began noticing the mountain from the local Tokaido-road. But even before then, people had admired the beautiful mountain.

Great Wave off Kanagawa

Great Wave off Kanagawa

The mountain has inspired artists, writers and poets for centuries. Perhaps the most famous art is Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji by Katsushika Hokusai. This…

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